In the Field

Asian Carp VS Rainbow Trout – Battle of the Bones – Deboning Fish

Asian Carp VS Rainbow Trout – Battle of the Bones – Deboning Fish

One of the biggest complaints that people have in regard to eating the delicious, nutritious, yet troublesome invasive Asian carp, is the issue of bones. Many folks who are otherwise willing to a give these fish a try at the dinner table state that the reason they won’t eat them is because they have too many bones. In this blog and video, we’ll take a look at just how many bones these fish have as compared to other popular eating fish and if removing them is really that big of a deal.

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The Asian carp is indeed a rather boney fish and their bone structure is a little different from other popular freshwater species. Silver and bighead Asian carp have an intricate Y-bone structure that can make processing them a challenge…that is, if you want a boneless fillet. Here in the USA, we’ve become conditioned to buying and consuming highly processed food. The meat and fish that the majority of Americans eat comes packaged in Styrofoam and plastic wrap, instead of fur and scales. As a result, many people don’t have the patience or even the knowledge to deal with bones. At the same time though, those who do enjoy eating a wide variety of fish certainly don’t mind the slight inconvenience of picking out, or around, a few bones here and there. And in other countries and cultures where fish is a primary staple of nutrition, a “boneless” fillet is unheard of. Picking out the bones while eating it is simply the norm.

Eat the Enemy - A Complete Guide to Catching and Cooking Asian Carp -Joseph Classen
Eat the Enemy – A Complete Guide to Catching and Cooking Asian Carp -by Joseph Classen

So how big of a hassle is it really to remove the bones from a cooked Asian carp fillet before eating it? Well, you’re about to find out. I thought I’d do a little experiment in which I’d cook a whole trout and compare the bone removal process to that of taking the bones out of a cooked silver carp fillet. Cooking whole trout is a very popular method for preparing and eating them, and as I often tell folks, removing the bones from an Asian carp fillet is no more difficult or time consuming than taking them out of a delicious rainbow trout, as many have no problem with whatsoever. So let’s see just how long it takes to do each. Check out the video below to see the results…

 

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